What’s in the EPBC Box?

Unpackaging Australia’s national environmental law

By Peter Burnett

I’ve decided to pull apart Australia’s national environmental law, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Act 1999 (EPBC Act). I want to see what makes it tick and, perhaps more significantly, to see if I can explain what makes it tick.

I’m not doing this for fun; there are two major reviews coming up that will delve into this important law and I’d like to have my say in these reviews. If I’m going to have my say, I’ll have to go beyond just knowing what I’m talking about. I have to be able to communicate my understanding to support my point of view.

This is no easy task. A colleague of mine, with extensive experience in public policy but not environmental policy, recently tried to read the EPBC Act. He told me, with considerable frustration, that he found it virtually impenetrable.

I can also draw on personal experience. I recently gave a guest lecture about the Act as part of an environmental law course (the course was for non-lawyers). The blank looks I got from the students, and the absence of questions, challenged me to try a new approach to explaining what this important piece of legislation does.

The two upcoming reviews of the EPBC Act could have significant consequences for environmental law in Australia. The first is being carried out by the Productivity Commission and examines regulation of the resources sector. This review has just started and I discussed it in an earlier blog.

The second review examines the operation of the entire EPBC Act, something that the law requires every 10 years. This review is due to be announced in October.

Only for the ardent

The EPBC Act is around a thousand pages long! And that’s just the Act itself. This doesn’t include supporting regulations and guidelines. There are reasons for this length (and complexity).

Because of the peculiarities of Australian constitutional law, parts of the Act use arcane legal language to attach themselves to certain constitutional hooks.

The Act is also repetitive, because it applies similar processes to different things. The alternative would be to draft master provisions and apply them in multiple places through frequent cross-references. I’ve heard drafters argue that repetition makes the law easier to read but I’m not entirely convinced – what the Act gains in readability through repetition may be lost in the added length.

All in all, reading the Act is only for the ardent.

So, with the blank looks of the students still fresh in my memory, I decided to draw some pictures of it. I’d seen some well-drawn flow charts of some of the Act’s regulatory processes and thought I could do something similar, with a broad readership in mind.

I started with the idea of reverse-engineering a piece of equipment, say an espresso machine: first identify the major components, such as reservoir, boiler and coffee grinder, further dismantling each as necessary to see what it does. Then assemble the machine and observe how the components complement each other to produce a finished product.

So what’s in the box?

It turns out that the Act has 16 major components, at least as I’ve counted them (and leaving out ‘ancillary equipment’ such as compliance powers).

You can see these in my diagram below (Figure 1). The parts fall into three streams, indicating that the Act has three broad functions.

Figure 1: The main components of the EPBC Act (omitting supporting provisions such as compliance powers)

The first stream is about identifying various environmental values for protection. This mostly covers threatened species and special places. Once these values are identified, usually through a formal listing process, they are ‘protected’ by the Act. This means it becomes an offence to do something likely to harm them significantly, unless one obtains permission to do so (see stream three).

Because this is a national law, the values protected are predominantly things of high significance, such as World Heritage places or nationally-threatened species. Hence the term for many of them is ‘matters of national environmental significance’ (or MNES).

Apart from MNES, some values are there because they fall into categories that are protected by federal law alone. For example, marine species are included because the jurisdiction of the Australian states ends three nautical miles from the coast, while our Exclusive Economic Zone goes out 200 nautical miles.

The second stream is about planning for conservation. The Act doesn’t just cover planning connected to MNES and Commonwealth areas. It also provides for bioregional plans across the continent and its territorial sea, although with the major qualifier that for a region within a state (ie most of terrestrial Australia), the plans can only be done in cooperation with that state.

So far, there haven’t been any bioregional plans done with states, something I’ll discuss in another blog.

The third stream is about assessing and approving things that might harm the environmental values protected by the Act, or in the case of trade, the environment generally. The best known component in the third stream is project-based environmental impact assessment, but there is also provision for strategic environmental assessment of development.

This stream also covers assessment and approval of trade in species, whether these be endangered species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), native species for export or exotics for import.

Putting the parts together

Despite the complexity of the Act, its components do seem to fit relatively comfortably into these three broad streams. These are based on the protection and conservation of many of Australia’s most important environmental values, plus the power to assess and, if appropriate, approve (usually subject to conditions) developments that might harm what is protected and conserved.

In the broad this seems like a reasonable approach to looking after the environment while allowing for development. However, as I’ll explain in future blogs, there’s devil in the detail. In its current form, the framework does not realise its potential.

4 thoughts on “What’s in the EPBC Box?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s